For The Love Of New Orleans Architectural Styles

A mighty wind may blow, howl, scream and threaten destruction, but never underestimate the resolve of a city whose beauty and soul is rooted in its centuries-old history – a city seemingly built to entice and enchant the eye as well as the heart of those who admire and appreciate this architectural landmark called New Orleans.

New Orleans architectural styles fascinate me more and more with each and every visit to the Crescent City.  With a flair for finery reminiscent of the 18th century French and Spanish influence from which it came, New Orleans architectural elements are without a doubt some of the most notable, emulated and coveted features in architectural and interior design today.

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Beginning with an iconic favorite, the iconic gas lamp is synonymous with New Orleans architectural style.  Authentically crafted in antiqued copper, the Bevolo French Quarter lamp is one the most recognizable architectural elements lighting the streets, sidewalks, storefronts and entryways throughout the French Quarter and Garden District.  Cementing its role as a prominent New Orleans architectural element, Bevolo Gas and Electric Lights began in the French Quarter in 1945.  The design vision and expert craftsmanship of Andrew Bevolo Sr. together with the tales of renowned architect A. Hays Town resulted in a brilliant design execution.  The French Quarter gas lamp is quintessential New Orleans and an architectural element that commands attention to detail.

Lantern_in_courtyard._May_1936._-_The_Cabildo,_711_Chartres_Street,_New_Orleans,_Orleans_Parish,_LA_HABS_LA,36-NEWOR,4-13.tifNew Orleans’ historic landmarks The Cabildo ~ May 1936

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Columns, ornate wrought-iron laced designs and historic balconies rule the New Orleans architectural elements royal court.  These sublime features wrap the city in intricate detail so historically ingrained and so hauntingly associated with the French and Spanish style architectural history of New Orleans.

“New Orleans makes it possible to go to Europe without ever leaving the United States.”

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

808px-LePretre_Mansion_Orleans_St_Pharmacy_1958Gardette-LaPrete House (The Sultan’s Palace)

columnEmerald Coast Gallery

768px-JosephineStRevivalhouse30Nov07GateDoor1Early 19th Century Greek Revival

Thoughts of what once was and what could be again dance the dance of possibility in the minds of restorers, the hands of architects, the boards of designers and the hearts of the New Orleans devoted.  Purveyors of architectural grandeur understand and infinitely appreciate the fine point of architectural perfection in an imperfect state.

columns-garden-districtCorinthian Columns

Age is a visitor from time that comes to the New Orleans architectural styles party often as an uninvited guest, but one embraced for its weathered and worn wonder with awed appreciation nonetheless.

verdigrisHouse Beautiful

Victorian-turretVictorian Turret

Exposed brick walls epitomize traditional 19th century New Orleans architecture.  If these walls could talk, what stories they could tell!

exposed-brick-wall-New-OrleansNew Orleans Local

The word on the streets of New Orleans is revered as an art form.  Dating back over 100 years, encaustic tiles were used throughout the city of New Orleans to identify street names.

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Numerous buildings and streets of The French Quarter display the painted and embossed encaustic tiles as a historic form of identification of the old Spanish colonial street names.

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Opulent crystal chandeliers are synonymous with the finery that is New Orleans’ antiquities.  Ornate moldings, ceiling medallions, elliptical archways and decorative trimmings denote the architectural element hallmarks of the city’s Greek Revival homes.

new-orleans-house-proud-interiorsPhotos by Sara Essex Bradley 
From House Proud: Unique Home Design/Louisiana by Valorie Hart

Dating back to the 1850s, the ornamental wrought and cast iron balconies, fences, galleries and gates of the Vieux Carré stand tall as the prominent architectural element most associated with the oldest neighborhood in New Orleans.

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 Pairing these two design elements together is a bespoke design element demonstrated throughout the Crescent City.

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Elaborate in design and characteristic of the French Quarter, ornamental ironwork frames a large portion of the landmarks and homes of New Orleans.

feather-bracketsfeather brackets

The New Orleans Shotgun house possesses an exterior charm as unique as the feather, scroll and gingerbread architectural elements for which they are known.  A shotgun house is elongated in length and narrow in width with rooms flowing one into another.  Modeled in Eastlake, Neoclassical Revival and Italianate styles, the shotgun houses throughout the City of New Orleans were built with lot size constraints in mind.  Form follows function applies here.

shotgun-house-New-OrleansNew Orleans Real Estate, Today and Yesterday

Distinctive color combinations and Victorian gingerbread or lacy brackets characterize the front façade of the New Orleans’ shotgun house.

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Shuttered doors and windows continue to be a prominent fixture among the classic New Orleans architectural element scene.  Adopting and adapting exteriors to mirror the customary French architectural design element of louvered shutters on all windows caught on and remains one of the most instantly recognizable traits of New Orleans design.  Shuttered doors and windows were strictly a utilitarian feature with a three fold purpose early on- privacy, protection from wind and sun and to control ventilation.  The climate of New Orleans is not one that is conducive to complete comfort in the spring and summer months.  Shuttered doors and windows remain a characteristic feature of French Quarter buildings, restaurants and hotels today.  I have opened many a window and French door and pulled many a pair of shutters my way over the years to block the noise from the streets of the French Quarter.

1344483687_3141cc90bc_oBosque House Courtyard

An architectural enigma of sorts in a city so well know for public displays, the New Orleans’ courtyard is viewed as an architectural feat of patio splendor.  The New Orleans courtyard is an intimate walled garden usually tucked away from street view- a hidden and shaded Shangri-La.  Flowing fountains, lush plants and fragrant tropicals line the walls of the courtyard providing a tranquil place for residents, tourists and locals alike to ensconced themselves in privacy.  This is my idea of The Big Easy.

1345410562_62deda1dac_bAngel In Fountain – Le Petit Theatre

New Orleans’ native-born son, the incomparable Louis Armstrong, croons the question “Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?”  The influence of the New Orleans architectural element in today’s interiors and exteriors is undeniable.   Gorgeous copper, antique New Orleans bricks, ornamental iron, ceiling medallions, ornate chandeliers and shutters drive my interior design and decorating choices.  I guess I do know what it means to love the architectural styles of New Orleans.

 Love your style!

Royal Redo, Remodel, Rearrange, Remove, Repaint, Rethink of Elvis The King’s Jungle Room

Channel surfing through the digital guide, I noticed Turner Classic Movies is once again featuring a day of Elvis Presley movies in cinematic celebration of what would have been his 81st birthday.  Our son’s girlfriend recently visited Graceland, and her review of the interiors, especially The King’s Jungle Room, was one of mixed reactions. Time stood still for the decor of Graceland decades ago, but giving a bit of thought to a just for decorative fun update poses the question, how difficult would it be to untacky the tacky?  Immediately I put on my redo, remodel, rearrange, remove, repaint, rethink thinking cap on. Seldom is over the top flamboyant chic the style aimed for when designing and decorating commercial and residential spaces, but not all commercial and residential spaces are created equal.  There are spaces and places where understated just won’t do.

The_Grand_Trianon_Castle_InteriosThe Palace of Versailles

Ostentatious decorating and design has a standing relationship with grand scale museums, historical homes, architectural marvels, Las Vegas and hooray for Hollywood interiors.  Some tacky, some tasteful, some unforgettable and some better forgotten. What is it they say about beauty being in the eye of the beholder? Celebrities love to dial up extravagance in a manner befitting a true Hollywood style story.  You live what you know as some would say, and if flamboyant is just another day at the office it becomes the rule versus the exception.  Paging Liberace, Elvis and Michael Jackson!  Talk about extravagance on and off the stage.

Liberacevia

From the articles, books and interviews I’ve read referencing the interior spaces of Elvis Presley’s Graceland, his flamboyant personal taste and style on stage followed through to his home as well.  I often find myself deep in if this was my house, hotel, or shop thought – a first cousin to window shopping for the decorating minded. Deep contemplation of exactly how I would redo, remodel, rearrange, remove, repaint, rethink the entire design takes over, and suddenly I’m looking for pen and paper to jot down ideas and sketches. I do the same thing when watching a television show or movie.  Drives Dave the Builder crazy! My redesign and redecorating services have not been engaged by famous architects, heads of Hollywood studios, hoteliers or the fine folks at Graceland, but a girl can ponder can’t she?

GracelandJungleRoomThe Jungle Room via Wikimedia Commons

In an article on How Stuff Works,  it is revealed Elvis purchased the furniture for the jungle room on a spur of the moment whim to stir up his father.  The article states Elvis’ father thought the furniture was the ugliest he had ever seen.  I must admit I agree, which brings us to today’s let’s redo, remodel, rearrange, remove, repaint, rethink the entire design: The King’s Jungle Room edition.

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jungle-room-accessories

Hermes Set of Four African Animal Theme Ashtrays In Box

Hermes Set of Four African Animal Theme Ashtrays In Box

crocodile-cigar-case18-Carat Gold Mounted, Crocodile Cigar Case, England, 1903

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home-barDomaine

ken-fulk-designerArchitectural Digest

This is how a bold, chic and sexy space is done.  I believe they call it animal magnetism.

animal-printsTraditional Home

But there’s a pretty little thing
Waiting for the King
And she’s down in the jungle room

Walking in Memphis
Marc Cohn

Love your style!

Colors Along The Bayou

We Louisianians are a patient people.  We are aware our neighbors to the North actually get to experience seasonal foliage and fall colors before mid to late November. Fall takes it time getting down to Louisiana, but when it does it stunningly shows its true colors along the bayou in perfect fall form.  I’ve yet to find a better way to take it all in than to hit the road with camera in hand, Dave the Builder at the wheel, and the words from the song “Drive South” defining the moment.

Come on baby drive South
With the one you love
Come on baby drive South

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You can be guaranteed if it’s late November the locals are asking, “Are the leaves in color on the bayou Ginkgo?”   This famous landmark Ginkgo tree has served as the picture perfect photo backdrop for generations of  local residents.  This picture does not do justice to just how beautiful these colors along the bayou really are.

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Decades old iron bridge railing has aged gracefully through the years. Brick-lined streets, decorative ironwork and historical homes make a drive though the garden district a trip through time.

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Further South down the road we go to another small town favorite, Lea’s Lunch Room. Lea’ s is known throughout the United States as the place for pie. It’s a standing game day tradition to stop at Lea’s for one of their famous ham sandwiches and a piece of pie on the way to Tiger Stadium. Recently, Lea’s Lunchroom was listed in the USA TODAY Travel article “10 best: Delicious Pies around the South.”  All that driving and photographing works up an appetite, and it is the best excuse I know of to order up a sandwich and a slice of coconut pie with sky high meringue to-go, of course.  On the road again…

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The Mary McCoy Big House stands steeped in history on the Solomon Northup Trail. The story of Solomon Northup was the subject of the film, 12 Years a Slave. The Bayou Boeuf community and the parishes of Central Louisiana historically factor into the life of Solomon Northup.  When I was in college at LSU I used the Mary McCoy Big House as my thirty minutes to home mile marker. Lots of history and beauty associated with this local landmark.

bunkie-house1Click on image to enlarge

Like the leaves, the colors of the season are changing from browns and oranges to brighter reds and traditional greens. This much needed road trip was all the detour needed to help me collect my thoughts and take a breather before the next phase begins. December 1st signals the official Christmas season kick off.  Here we go!

Love your style!

Never Forget: September 11, 2001

Today marks an anniversary in American history that forever changed our nation.  We’ve come to mark today as a day of remembrance and reflection, a day we come together in thought, moments of silence, ringing of bells and prayer.

Never Forget: September 11, 2001 

never-forget

Today marks an anniversary in American history that forever changed our nation.  We’ve come to mark today as a day of remembrance and reflection, a day we come together in thought, moments of silence, ringing of bells and prayer.  Never forget the fallen heroes, families, friends and fellow Americans whose lives were forever changed that day.  Our memories will forever be filled with the events of that horrific day in our history, and even though painful to remember we should never choose to forget.

God bless America,

Land that I love,

Stand beside her, and guide her

Through the night with a light from above.

From the mountains, to the prairies,

To the oceans, white with foam

God bless America, My home sweet home

God bless America, My home sweet home.

 

Never forget,

Dave and Darleen

 

 

A Most Fetching Friday

fetch·ing

/ˈfeCHiNG/

adjective

adjective: fetching

attractive.

synonyms: attractive, appealing, sweet, pretty, good-looking, lovely, delightful, charming,prepossessing, captivating, enchanting, irresistible

This week’s Fetching Friday places the accent on classic.

portraitTraditional in Gold via New England Home

‘Tis the weekend of the 127 Yard Sale aka The World’s Largest Yard Sale.  The Places In The Home Gang hit the sale in Gadsden, Alabama many moons ago on our way back home from our annual trek to the hills and mountains of East Tennessee.  The already overloaded Excursion and U-Haul ( it was very normal for us to pick, hunt and buy enough treasures, trinkets and trash to warrant renting a u-Haul).  Have any of you ever been to The World’s Largest Yard Sale?  Please share!  I love this pic from Authentica Classics.  More where that come from here.

world's-longest-yard-saleDiscovered Treasures – World’s Longest Yard Sale via Authentica Classics

Gone with the Wind is as famous for its lines as it is for the movie itself.  If I had a nickle for every time “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn”  has been quoted well, you know.  Good Housekeeping recently informed its readers the infamous ending almost wasn’t the famous ending as we know it.  An alternate ending has been revealed through the recent findings of a script.  Take a look at what words Scarlett may have spoken over at Good Housekeeping.

gone-with-the-wind-scriptHeritage Auctions

Speaking of iconic, the image below is of the interior of the actual  brownstone on 64 Perry Street, New York, New York  otherwise known as Carrie Bradshaw’s apartment in Sex and the City.

Ornate-crown-ceiling-moldings-make-apartment-historicPop Sugar –  Sotheby’s Realty

shipsClassic navy never looked so beautiful!  via Traditional Home

St. Louis CathedralThe classic interior beauty and architecture of the St. Louis Cathedral make it a premier historical New Orleans landmark.

I hope yours is a most fetching Friday.

Love your style!

Tour de Mystery: The Myrtles Mystery Tour

Moving on to the second part of our The Myrtles: Inspiration, History and Mystery adventure, we pick up with our party of three filling the afternoon hours taking in local points of interest while counting down the time to The Myrtles Mystery Tour portion of our trip to St. Francisville, Louisiana. This story takes place fifteen years ago,  right around the time I opened Hopefully Classic Antiques and Interiors.  As you can imagine, antique shopping was high on the list of things to do, see and buy.  I can’t begin to tell you how much I love antiquing.  Dave the Builder gets into it, and being the fabulous parents we are we know how to bribe entertain our son while antiquing and attending auctions. We trekked the streets and shops of downtown St. Francisville until we could trek no more.  New Roads, here we come!

New Roads, Louisiana1, 23

In a glowing review of  highlights and attractions not to be missed was the story of Miss Emily.  Miss Emily was a local woman who worked the queue of vehicles waiting to board the ferry selling parched peanuts, homemade pralines and soft drinks from a large basket.  I love it!  Sitting in line waiting to drive onto the ferry goes better with an ice cold Coke, salty peanuts and a homemade praline. We continued our afternoon nosh aboard the ferry as we crossed the Mississippi River. This unique mode of transportation is now closed.  In the name of progress and moving on up, the ferry has been replaced by the  John James Audubon Bridge.  I’m glad we got the chance take a ride on it before it did.

John James Audubonvia

New Roads did not disappoint. I didn’t know what I was expecting in return from this small town, but it delivered lagniappe in a big way.  We found our way to the main part of town and hit up several antique shops.  The first shop (sorry, I can’t remember the name of any of the shops) specialized in clocks and vintage walking sticks.  Dave the Builder was in his height of glory.  We were welcomed into the shop by an older gentleman who was the owner and a lovely, lovely older lady whose greeting came in the form of  my kind of question, “champagne or fruit punch?”

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New Trad Mimosa

Our son put in his request for the fruit punch. I guess she could tell I was a little apprehensive about their comfort level with him in the shop with a goblet full of bright red fruit punch.  I knew this kid was raised in and around the biz and the dos and don’ts in shops and showrooms,  but I also knew she was not privy to this pertinent piece of information.  This lovely and wise woman handled the situation with such grace and tact.  She invited him to follow her to the butler’s pantry to help fix the drinks and slip a cookie or two.  She realized right quick she had made a new friend.  Gosh, what a great memory!  We sipped, shopped and scored two of the most unique antique walking sticks.  I wish I had them both today, but I sold them to a client the following week.  Oh well, the memory is more valuable to me than the walking sticks could ever be.

The Myrtles Mystery TourCountry Living

We found a couple of other shops and enjoyed the local fare before heading back via ferry to St. Francisville.  The timing was just right as it was barking up on sunset and coffee time. We crossed another suggested stop off our list by visiting The Magnolia Cafe.  This place is right up our alley- an unpretentious do drop inn heavy on casual fun, food and drink.

History & Haunting of the Myrtles Plantation

History & Haunting of the Myrtles Plantation

It was about that time to head out for the Myrtles Mystery Tour.  We drove up the winding driveway of The Myrtles, and the setting and timing could not have been better to set the mood and the tone for a mystery tour. The above image says it better than I can. We claimed three of the large rocking chairs on the veranda and pondered what was to come.  While the crowd and the anticipation built, certain imaginations showed signs of running away with the night.  Miss Hester, our tour guide for the evening, casually opened the front door at precisely 7:00 pm and invited the crowd of about twenty to come right on in.  Talk about playing to an attentive and crowded room!  We all gathered together in the foyer with wide eyes and listening ears.  This is where things begin to get interesting.

Stay tuned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional image credit: The Kitchn,  Southern Living/Robbie Caponetto

The Myrtles: Inspiration, History and Mystery

In the daily meeting with the Places In The Home creative team (me, myself and I),  quiet and centered thought brings forth ideas. Sometimes it all runs together, and at other times the ideas and interest flow like the mighty Mississippi River. There’s a world of inspiration out there folks!  I love the search, especially when it is right here at home. October is a great month for antiquing, fall road trips and home tours. We took October very serious a few years back and set out on a intrigue packed afternoon and evening fondly referred to as The Myrtles: Inspiration, History and Mystery.

antique sideboard

Working for family is a trick and a treat.  I set the tone for a blissful and professional working relationship right off the bat,  and we’re off and decorating. My brother is once again enlisting my help in redecorating his den and foyer. He didn’t realize he also wants to freshen up his dining room decor until I gently persuaded him to do so.

formal dining room

His circa 1903 home is one of the few Victorian turret architecture examples in the state. Staying true to the period is an absolute must on the exterior for historical purposes however,  I am allowed to blur the lines when it comes to the interior.  Small changes and edits keep the bottom line affordable and in check with current styles.  Changing the neutral color palette is off limits.  He loves it, and it flows with the historical aspect of the home.

table lampsclick on image to enlarge

New lamps for the sideboard and replacing the dining room chairs ( bad, very bad) is first on the list.  He has tried his best to get his hands on the balustrade lamp Dave the Builder made for me.  Dear brother, it ain’t happening.  That is the reason I sourced lamps in a more sophisticated image of  my lamp for his consideration. We will also be paying attention to new curtains or perhaps new trim for the existing ones, a new rug and lowering the artwork and framed photos. I have to consider the twelve foot ceilings, proportion of the space and overall balance when placing artwork.

Placing items and photographing the space for reference reminded me of the details surrounding the silver lazy susan with double turned malachite handles atop the sideboard.  St. Francisville, Louisiana is a charming  town rich in history and historical sites.  My brother is a history buff who really appreciates the architecture of  historical homes.  He enthusiastically believes no trip to St. Francisville is complete without a tour of The Myrtles Plantation.

The Myrtles Plantationvia

The Myrtles Plantation  is not without national media attention. Referred to as one of “America’s Most Haunted Homes”, The Myrtles has been the subject of interest, articles and television documentaries from Veranda, Travel and Leisure, The New York Times and The History Channel to the one I most remember, the visit with cameras rolling from Oprah Winfrey.  As visitors make their way up the winding driveway to the entrance of the circa 1796 Antebellum mansion, distinctive features such as the brick courtyard, double dormers and the lacy wrought iron wrapped front veranda captures the eye. I could sit on the veranda in the large rocking chairs staring out at the moss draped live oaks and lush grounds for hours.  One Saturday afternoon and evening fifteen years ago I did just that.

Photos of Myrtles Plantation, Saint Francisville

Dave the Builder, our son and I went to Baton Rouge for a working vacation.  My brother suggested we drive over to St. Francisville and New Roads to check out the sites and tour The Myrtles.  If we did tour The Myrtles he wanted me to pay close attention to the silver lazy susan in the dining room.  We bounced the idea around, decided what the heck, and off down Hwy. 61 we went.  Our first order of business when we arrived was to have  lunch at The Carriage House Restaurant at The Myrtles Plantation.

The Carriage House Restaurant at The Myrtles Plantationvia

Our waitress inquired if this was our first time to The Myrtles.  She gave us the poop scoop on the town, the shops, and the Saturday evening Myrtles Mystery Tour. The Mystery Tour is held on Friday and Saturday nights,  and is touted as the opportune time for Chloe, the reported ghost known to inhabit the house and grounds of The Myrtles, to make an appearance. Our son was captivated, my curiosity was piqued,  and Dave the Builder thought it would be a fun way to spend a Louisiana Saturday night.  I made reservations for the three of us for the 7:00 pm tour, and we left the grounds highly anticipating our return.

In part two of Three Part Harmony: Inspiration, History and Mystery I’ll tell the tale of Chloe, recount our ferry trip to New Roads and the infamous peanut lady, antiquing,  champagne punch, and the fun and fright of the Mystery Tour.

 

 

Holiday At Home: Louisiana Christmas Traditions

As the holiday good times roll on so do the  at home favorites. From parish to parish and festival to festival, Louisiana Christmas traditions light up a festive holiday season.

Acadian Village~ photo: Meg McKinney

Holiday at home in Louisiana themed decorations, lights, treasures, treats, and reminders find their way into my holiday thoughts and decor.

From  mid November through early January, 2013 the Natchitoches, Louisiana Landmark Historic District along the Cane River is illuminated in over 300,000 Christmas lights and 100 riverbank set pieces in celebration of the Christmas Festival of Lights. Shopping, dining, antiquing, horse drawn carriage rides, live entertainment, and legendary fireworks displays each Saturday night make this one of the most anticipated traditions of the holiday season.

Sleigh Ride by the Louisiana born, raised, and swingin’  Harry Connick, Jr.

These vintage snaps are blasts from Louisiana Christmas past of my mother and brother, uncles and cousins and yours truly with the Claus.

Dave the Builder and I took a Christmas light walking tour through our neighborhood a couple of evenings ago, and this Christmas nativity display captured the essence of the season for both of us.

The large glass pine cone and Santa ornaments cast a vintage feel, taking me straight back to the country Christmases spent at my maternal grandmother’s house.

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New Orleans knows how to throw a  party and a holiday celebration! No trip to New Orleans, the French Quarter, and the French Market would be complete without a visit to Aunt Sally’s Creole Pralines Shop. Believe me, Christmas time is the perfect time for a box or two of New Orleans’ signature candy. Ca c’est bon, y’all!

My small but cherished collection of hand-painted Louisiana cypress Santas add a dash of Louisiana seasoning to the holiday scheme each year.

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Do you incorporate a touch of at home in your holiday decor and celebrations?

holiday-signature-Christmas

Historic Homes And The Beauty Of Their Architectural Elements

Architectural integrity through architectural elements is the indelible mark of historic homes and landmarks.

Longwood

It is usually the only tangible proof of bygone golden eras ruled by classic styles.

Cornstock Hotel

Restoration efforts and day to day upkeep of historic homes can be financially mind boggling.  The sheer expense of replicating these styles in today’s market can create financial hurdles difficult to clear.  Aging and changing neighborhoods coupled with a natural progression away from this style of living  places most of  these homes in the private sector on an endangered species list.

historic homes of New Orleans

The craftsmanship, detail to details, and artisan skills used to envision, shape, form, and build these homes fascinate me. Over the years we have had the opportunity to tour, consult on, and donate antique pieces to several state and privately owned historic homes.

Bishops Palace

As much as I love antiques I will walk right by a period piece without so much as a glance to get to the heart of the historic matter.  Architectural elements  grab and hold my attention.

architectural elements

In our city we have a block that is known as Mansion Row.  Anchoring the far left corner of the block stands the Thompson-Hargis Mansion.  Built in 1907, this Greek Revival home with characteristic Ionic columns, porte-cochère, triangle pediment, and transom entry was once a jewel in the crown of our city history.  The exterior and grounds showed the weathered look of sun and time- nothing paint and repair could not fix.  The property was structurally sound and the architectural integrity intact.

Thompson-Hargis Mansion

The furnishings were removed years ago, the windows and doors boarded, and the grand dame beautifully sat idling until this past Sunday evening when she fell victim to a senseless demise.

historical home

Neighbors who recall the elegance of what was and admirers of what could have been mourn the total loss of of property, history, and hope.

Thompson-Hargis

It is a sad turn of events and an even sadder realization that original, historic, and one of a kind architectural elements were destroyed. Dollars do not factor into the equation, there is no replacement value for the architectural integrity of this 105 year old home. RIP Thompson-Hargis Mansion.

historical mansion

Preserving history and restoring things runs in my family. Dave the Builder and I preserve antique and architectural pieces.  My brother purchased, moved, and restored his circa 1903 Victorian home – his second property to restore.  I am currently in the process of photographing his home to feature in a future post.  Stay tuned.

 

 

 

images:  Preservation in Mississippi, New Orleans Homes and Neighborhoods, Galveston History, History of a House Museum,  NOLA, Old Houses, Frenchtowner,  Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation, Perpetual Renovator, We Saw That

Let Your Lights Shine!

Christmas lights from around the world brought to you by holiday spirit, magnificent talent, skill and style extraordinaire, and historical architectural wonders of the world as seen through the lens of talented photographers.

Fifth Avenue~ New York, New York

Mann’s Grauman Chinese Theater~ Hollywood, California

Jackson Square~ New Orleans, Louisiana

Empire State Building~ New York, New York

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele~ Milan, Italy

Shops in Seiffen, Germany

U.S. Capital~ Washington, DC

Sydney, Australia

Caesars Palace~ Las Vegas, Nevada

Auckland, New Zealand

Rockefeller Center~ New York, New York

Melksham, United Kingdom

calle de Alcala~ Madrid, Spain

Champs-Élysées~ Paris, France

Buckingham Palace~ London, England

 La Grande Place~ Brussels, Belgium

 

Photo sources:

Fifth Avenue: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Mann’s Grauman Chinese Theater: Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images

Jackson Square: Sean Gardner/Getty Images

Empire State Building: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Seiffen, Germany: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

U.S. Capital: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sydney, Australia: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

Caesars Palace: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Auckland, New Zealand: Sandra Mu/Getty Images

Rockefeller Center: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Melksham, UK: Matt Cordy/Getty Images

calle de Alcala: Liesa Johannssen/Getty Images

Champs-Élysée: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Buckingham Palace: Steve Finn/Getty Images

La Grande Place: Mark Renders/Getty Images