Creole or Cajun? Louisiana Jambalaya

This post state dinner post is all about the c’est si bon.  I got completely caught up in the design and decorating details of the event, but knew I would be remiss it I did not chime in on the menu choice of jambalaya in the style of Louisiana jambalaya.  Cooked in the flavor traditions of New Orleans, the dish served at the State Dinner was Carolina Gold Rice Jambalaya.

The in the tradition of New Orleans seasonings jambalaya reviews are in from Senior Louisiana senator Bill Cassidy who was in attendance.

Rice pilaf.

Now that’s funny.

Anywho, a quick google search provided a recipe from Carolina Rice for Carolina Gold Rice Jambalaya.  As delectable as the recipe may cook up to be, if you’ve never tasted Louisiana Creole or Cajun jambalaya, you’re not eating Louisiana jambalaya.

Trust me on this one.  The taste buds don’t lie.

Louisiana chefs of restaurant and at-home test kitchen skill alike master their personal versions of this flavor rich to the core one-pot rice dish.  We’re all about the one-pot dish down here in the boot.  Variety is the spice of life and Louisiana jambalaya recipes.  There is Creole jambalaya and there is Cajun jambalaya.  The main difference boils down to the addition or exclusion of one ingredient- tomato.  Creole jambalaya (red jambalaya) is made with tomato (diced, paste, etc.) whereas Cajun jambalaya (brown jambalaya) is made without.  The holy trinity of chopped onion, bell pepper, and celery is flavor front and center in both, chicken, sausage and/or shrimp serves to further accentuate the flavor, and spice combinations work their seasoning magic. blue dutch oven

The great big blue pot aka dutch oven vs. Magnalite classic round dutch oven boils down to tradition and personal preference.  If Magnalite is the cookware of choice in your granmè, grand-mère, mamé, meme or mamaw’s kitchen, chances are it is in yours too.  Tradition is the key ingredient in regional dishes and the passed down from generation to generation recipes we love to cook.

 

Magnalite-dutch-oven

Magnalite Cookware Classic 5-qt. Round Dutch Oven

I cover all the culinary bases by owning both.  While I am loyal to the Magnalite dutch oven my mother-in-law’s best friend gave us as a wedding gift 35+ years ago however, the big blue pot cooks as pretty as it looks.

the-essentials

Let’s cover the essential c’est si bon that go so well with jambalaya.

Louisiana Hot Sauce

Crystal-hot-sauce-bottle

Southern Buttermilk Cornbread

southern-buttermilk-cornbread-in-black-iron-skillet

Creole Cajun Seasoning

Creole-seasoning

Creole Cajun Seasoning

1/3  cup paprika

3  tablespoons dried oregano

3  tablespoons ground black pepper

2  tablespoons dried basil

1  tablespoon dried thyme

2  tablespoons kosher salt

1  tablespoons cayenne pepper

1  tablespoon granulated onion

4  teaspoons dried thyme

4  teaspoons granulated garlic

In a medium bowl combine paprika, dried oregano, dried thyme, ground black pepper, dried basil, kosher salt, cayenne pepper, granulated onion, dried thyme and granulated garlic.  Stir to combine.  Can be stored in an airtight container for up to three months.

Louisiana Jambalaya

Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya from New Orleans’s Cafe Reconcile

Chicken and sausage is the Places In The Home house favorite for gumbo and Louisiana jambalaya.  Time is not on my side at posting, so I am using the image of the chicken and sausage jambalaya from New Orleans’s Cafe Reconcile as featured on Louisiana Cookin’.

Tried it.

Loved it.

Prepared it.

Sharing it.

Cafe Reconcile Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya 

Ingredients

2 pounds mild smoked pork sausage, sliced ¼-inch-thick

2½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken, chopped

1½ cups onions, finely chopped

1 cup finely chopped celery

1 cup finely chopped bell pepper

2 tablespoons minced garlic

1 cup diced tomato

1 (6-ounce) can tomato paste

1 tablespoon Creole seasoning

1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

2¼ teaspoons fresh thyme

2¼ teaspoons chopped fresh basil

5⅓ cups chicken stock

1½ pounds long-grain rice

Directions

In a large cast-iron Dutch oven, cook sausage on high heat for 3 minutes. Add chicken, and cook until browned on all sides, 15 to 20 minutes.

peppers-onions

Lower heat to medium, and add onion, celery, bell pepper, and garlic; cook until vegetables are soft, about 15 minutes.

chopped celery

Add tomatoes, tomato paste, Creole~Cajun seasoning, parsley, thyme, and basil.  Simmer over low heat for 10 minutes.

rice

Add chicken stock, and bring to a boil over high heat.  Add rice, and stir. When jambalaya returns to a boil, reduce heat to simmer.  Cover and cook until rice has absorbed all liquid, about 25 minutes.

~ Cafe Reconcile, New Orleans

cest-si-bon

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